Greg French Early Photography Greg French

      Greg French Early Photography Early Photography
      Greg French Early Photographyspecializing in nineteenth - century photographs
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BOYLSTON MARKET, BOSTON, JOHN QUINCY ADAMS & ANTI-SLAVERY: CHARLES BULFINCH, ARCHITECT

ALBUMEN PHOTO
$600. USD

The photograph is affixed to a mount, which is then affixed to another mount at upper corners, and there is a mat on top.

Blindstamp at lower right of photo: "BALDWIN COOLIDGE 154 TREMONT ST. BOSTON."

Signs:
- BOYLSTON MARKET 1809
- BOYSLTON 649 MARKET
- TUCKER & ROAK
- PRODUCE RECEIVERS AND JOBBERS. BUTTER & EGGS
- TUCKER AND ROAK. BEEF, PORK, VEAL, LAMB. POULTRY & GAME. FRUITE AND VEGETABLES. BUTER, LARD & EGGS
- 647 TUCKER & ROAK 647
- BOYLSTON ST.
- ... FAR... MERCHANT TAILOR.
- BOSTON. BOSTON THEATRE ONE WEEK ONLY...
- ... RICHARD MANSFIELD DR. JEKYLL AND MR HYDE...
- THE GLOBE. GLOBE THEATRE. 2D MONTH... RUDDYGORE IN THE WITCH'S CURSE CHORUS...
- PARK THEATRE
- ...RYDER & SON, REAL ESTATE BROKERS AND AUCTIONEERS. ... INSURANCE. MORTGAGES NEGOTIATED. Rooms 4 & 6 Boylston Hall
- G.H. WHEELER, REAL ESTAT, MORTGAGES AND INSURANCE. ROOMS 4 & 6
- F.W. RYDER, REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE BROKER, OFFICE ROOM 6
- JOHN L FARRELL, MERCHANT TAILOR
- ...NGH RESTAURANT
- OYSTERS
- SODA

"Boylston Market (1810-1887), designed by architect Charles Bulfinch, was located in Boston, Massachusetts, on the corner of Boylston and Washington Streets. Boylston Hall occupied the third floor of the building, and functioned as a performance and meeting space. The Boylston Market Association developed the building. John Quincy Adams served as the association's first president. In 1809, the proprietors paid $20,560 for the land formerly belonging to Joseph C. Dyer (and to Samuel Welles before him). The new building 'was named to honor the benevolent and philanthropic Ward Nicholas Boylston.'... Early tenants included the Linnaean Society of New England, and Edward Savage's New York Museum, c. 1812, both 'handsomely fitted with natural and artificial curiosities.' The Handel and Haydn Society held concerts in the hall for several years. In 1845 some of the members of the Workingmen's Protective Union opened a shop on the 2nd floor. Other vendors in the market included butter & cheese dealers M.C. Strout and F.H. Thomas (c. 1877). Special events in Boylston Hall included the New-England Anti-Slavery Convention, 1834; July 4 celebrations of the New England Anti-Slavery Society in the 1830s; and Corydon Donnavan's 'Grand Serial Panorama of Mexico,' c. 1848: 'Capt. Donnavan, for several months a prisoner during the recent war in [Mexico], will deliver an explanatory discourse, relating many incidents of the war, Mexican life, manners, as the painting passes before the audience.'" (source: Wikipedia)

"Charles Bulfinch (August 8, 1763 – April 15, 1844) was an early American architect, and has been regarded by many as the first native-born American to practice architecture as a profession. Bulfinch split his career between his native Boston and Washington, D.C., where he served as Commissioner of Public Building and built the intermediate United States Capitol rotunda and dome. His works are notable for their simplicity, balance, and good taste, and as the origin of a distinctive Federal style of classical domes, columns, and ornament that dominated early 19th-century American architecture... Bulfinch's first building was the Hollis Street Church (1788). Among his other early works are a memorial column on Beacon Hill (1789), the first monument to the American Revolution; the Federal Street theater (1793); the 'Tontine Crescent' (built 1793–1794, now demolished), fashioned in part after John Wood's Royal Crescent; the Old State House in Hartford, Connecticut (1796); and the Massachusetts State House (1798). He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1791. Over the course of ten years, Bulfinch built a remarkable number of private dwellings in the Boston area, including Joseph Barrell's Pleasant Hill (1793), a series of three houses in Boston for Harrison Gray Otis (1796, 1800, 1806), and the John Phillips House (1804). He built several churches in Boston, of which New North (built 1802–1804) is the last standing... From 1799 to 1817, he was the chairman of Boston's board of selectmen continuously, and served as a paid Police Superintendent, improving the city's streets, drains, and lighting. Under his direction, both the infrastructure and civic center of Boston were transformed into a dignified classical style. Bulfinch was responsible for the design of the Boston Common, the remodeling and enlargement of Faneuil Hall (1805), and the construction of India Wharf. In these Boston years he also designed the Massachusetts State Prison (1803); Boylston Market (1810); University Hall for Harvard University (1813–1814); the Meeting House in Lancaster, Massachusetts (1815–17); and the Bulfinch Building home of the Ether Dome at Massachusetts General Hospital (1818), its completion overseen by Alexander Parris, who was working in Bulfinch's office at the time the architect was summoned to Washington... In the summer of 1817, Bulfinch's roles as selectman, designer and public official coincided during a visit by President James Monroe... and a few months later (1818) Monroe appointed Bulfinch the successor to Benjamin Henry Latrobe (1764–1820) as Architect of the Capitol in Washington, D.C.... As Commissioner of Public Building, Bulfinch completed the Capitol's wings and central portion, designed the western approach and portico, and constructed the Capitol's original low wooden dome to his own design (replaced by the present cast-iron dome completed in the mid-1860s). In 1829 Bulfinch completed the construction of the Capitol, 36 years after its cornerstone was laid. During his interval in Washington, Bulfinch also drew plans for the State House in Augusta, Maine (1829–1832), a Unitarian Church and prison in Washington, D.C.. In 1827, he was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Honorary member. He returned to Boston in 1830, where he died on April 15, 1844, aged 80, and was buried in King's Chapel Burial Ground in Boston. His tomb was later moved to Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts..." (source: Wikipedia)

BOYLSTON MARKET, BOSTON
SIZE
Photo: Approximately 14 1/2 x 11 inches. First mount: Approximately 15 1/2 x 12 1/2 inches. Second mount and mat: Approximately 19 3/8 x 15 5/8 inches.
CONDITION
Photo: Discoloration at top. Spots, small marks, and some soiling. First mount: Discoloration around edges. Some soiling. Second mount: Good condition. Mat: Wear at bottom corners. A few scuff marks. Inside (portion not seen) has some discoloration.
APPEARANCE
Incredibly sharp! Fantastic signage. Very good tones. Great natural light. A gorgeous architectural photograph.

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